Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, relating to, or consisting of a syllable or syllables.
  • adj. Pronounced with every syllable distinct.
  • adj. Linguistics Designating a sound that is or can be the most sonorant segment of a syllable, as a vowel or a resonant. In the word riddle (rĭdˈl), the two syllabic sounds are the (i˘) and the (l).
  • adj. Of or being a form of verse based on the number of syllables in a line rather than on the arrangement of accents or quantities.
  • n. Linguistics A syllabic sound.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of, relating to, or consisting of a syllable or syllables.
  • adj. Pronounced with every syllable distinct.
  • adj. Designating a sound that is or can be the most sonorant segment of a syllable, as a vowel or a resonant. In the word riddle (rĭd'l), the two syllabic sounds are the (i˘) and the (l).
  • adj. Of, or being a form of verse, based on the number of syllables in a line rather than on the arrangement of accents or quantities.
  • n. A syllabic sound.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to a syllable or syllables.
  • adj. Consisting of a syllable or syllables.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to or consisting of a syllable or syllables: as, a syllabic accent; a syllabic augment.
  • Representing syllables instead of single sounds: said of an alphabetical sign, or of an alphabet or mode of writing: also used substantively.
  • Pronounced syllable by syllable; of elaborate distinctness.
  • n. See the extract.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. (of verse) having lines based on number of syllables rather than on rhythmical arrangement of stresses or quantities
  • adj. of or relating to syllables
  • adj. consisting of or using a syllabary
  • adj. consisting of a syllable or syllables
  • adj. (of speech sounds) forming the nucleus of a syllable

Etymologies

Medieval Latin syllabicus, from Greek sullabikos, from sullabē, syllable; see syllable.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Medieval Latin syllabicus, from Ancient Greek συλλαβικός (syllabikós), from συλλαβή (syllabē, "syllable"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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