Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To come, appear, or lie between two things: You can't see the lake from there because the house intervenes.
  • intransitive v. To come or occur between two periods or points of time: A year intervened between the two dynasties.
  • intransitive v. To occur as an extraneous or unplanned circumstance: He would have his degree by now if his laziness hadn't intervened.
  • intransitive v. To involve oneself in a situation so as to alter or hinder an action or development: "Every gardener faces choices about how and how much to intervene in nature's processes” ( Dora Galitzki).
  • intransitive v. To interfere, usually through force or threat of force, in the affairs of another nation.
  • intransitive v. Law To enter into a suit as a third party for one's own interests.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To come between, or to be between, persons or things; -- followed by between; as, the Mediterranean intervenes between Europe and Africa.
  • v. To occur, fall, or come between, points of time, or events; as, an instant intervened between the flash and the report; nothing intervened ( i. e., between the intention and the execution) to prevent the undertaking.
  • v. To interpose; as, to intervene to settle a quarrel; get involved, so as to alter or hinder an action
  • v. In a suit to which one has not been made a party, to put forward a defense of one's interest in the subject matter.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A coming between; intervention; meeting.
  • intransitive v. To come between, or to be between, persons or things; -- followed by between.
  • intransitive v. To occur, fall, or come between, points of time, or events
  • intransitive v. To interpose.
  • intransitive v. In a suit to which one has not been made a party, to put forward a defense of one's interest in the subject matter.
  • transitive v. To come between.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To come between; fall or happen between things, persons, periods, or events; be intermediate, or appear or happen intermediately.
  • To come between in act; act intermediately or mediatorially; interfere or interpose, as between persons, parties, or states.
  • In law, to interpose and become a party to a suit pending between other parties: as, stockholders may intervene in a suit against directors.
  • To come between; divide.
  • n. A coming together; a meeting.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. be placed or located between other things or extend between spaces and events
  • v. occur between other event or between certain points of time
  • v. get involved, so as to alter or hinder an action, or through force or threat of force

Etymologies

Latin intervenīre : inter-, inter- + venīre, to come.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

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