Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A proposition that is maintained by argument.
  • n. A dissertation advancing an original point of view as a result of research, especially as a requirement for an academic degree.
  • n. A hypothetical proposition, especially one put forth without proof.
  • n. The first stage of the Hegelian dialectic process.
  • n. The long or accented part of a metrical foot, especially in quantitative verse.
  • n. The unaccented or short part of a metrical foot, especially in accentual verse.
  • n. Music The accented section of a measure.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A statement supported by arguments.
  • n. A written essay, especially one submitted for a university degree.
  • n. An affirmation, or distinction from a supposition or hypothesis.
  • n. The accented part of the measure, expressed by the downward beat; the opposite of arsis.
  • n. The depression of the voice in pronouncing the syllables of a word.
  • n. The part of the metrical foot upon which such a depression falls.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A position or proposition which a person advances and offers to maintain, or which is actually maintained by argument.
  • n. Hence, an essay or dissertation written upon specific or definite theme; especially, an essay presented by a candidate for a diploma or degree.
  • n. An affirmation, or distinction from a supposition or hypothesis.
  • n. The accented part of the measure, expressed by the downward beat; -- the opposite of arsis.
  • n.
  • n. The depression of the voice in pronouncing the syllables of a word.
  • n. The part of the foot upon which such a depression falls.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The formulation in advance of a proposition to be proved; a position; a proposition which one advances and offers to maintain by argument against objections.
  • n. Hence An essay or dissertation upon a specific or definite theme, as an essay presented by a candidate for a diploma or degree, as for that of doctor.
  • n. A theme; a subject propounded for a school or college exercise; the exercise itself.
  • n. A premise assumed and not proved, although not self-evident; either a postulate or a definition.
  • n. The consequent of a hypothetical proposition.
  • n. In musical rhythmics, a heavy accent, such as in beating time is marked by a down-beat. See rhythm.
  • n. In prosody: Originally, and in more correct recent usage, that part of a foot which receives the ictus, or metrical stress.
  • n. In prevalent modern usage, the metrically unaccented part of a foot. See arsis, 1.
  • n. In ancient rhetoric, a general question, not limited to special persons and circumstances: opposed to a hypothesis, or question which is so limited.
  • n. In rhetoric, the part of a sentence preceding and correlated to the antithesis.
  • n. Synonyms Topic, Point, etc. See subject.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a treatise advancing a new point of view resulting from research; usually a requirement for an advanced academic degree
  • n. an unproved statement put forward as a premise in an argument

Etymologies

Latin, from Greek, from tithenai, to put. Senses 5 and 6, Middle English, from Late Latin, lowering of the voice, from Greek, downbeat, from tithenai.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin thesis, from Ancient Greek θέσις (thesis, "a proposition, a statement, a thing laid down, thesis in rhetoric, thesis in prosody") (Wiktionary)

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