Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • abbr. east
  • abbr. eastern
  • abbr. energy
  • abbr. Baseball error
  • abbr. excellent

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The fifth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.
  • n. Representing × 10x in floating-point notation.
  • n. Hexadecimal symbol for 14.
  • n. Energy.
  • n. IUPAC 1-letter abbreviation for glutamic acid
  • n. expectation function
  • n. The fifth letter of the English alphabet, called e and written in the Latin script.
  • n. The ordinal number fifth, derived from this letter of the English alphabet, called e and written in the Latin script.
  • n. Everyone.
  • n. East.
  • n. The illicit drug ecstasy (MDMA).
  • n. The grade below D in some grading systems. In most such systems, it is a failing grade.

Etymologies

From Latin E, from Ancient Greek Ε (E, "Epsilon"). (Wiktionary)
From Middle English and Old English upper case letter E and split of Æ, EA, EO, and Œ, from five 7th century replacements of Anglo-Saxon Futhorcs by Latin letters: (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • On this view, a particular experience E that is a veridical perception of a particular mind-independent object O will have an intentional content with a demonstrative element that successfully refers to O, and a distinct particular experience E* will have an intentional content with the same veridicality conditions only if its intentional content contains a demonstrative element that also refers to O.

    Petty Injuries

  • E and its negation ~E (assumed to be the locus of all the non-inferential changes in probability) from initial probabilities between zero and one to

    Bayesian Epistemology

  • A corollary is that, where H entails E, ~E would disconfirm H, by reducing its probability to zero.

    Bayesian Epistemology

  • While a proponent of theistic pragmatic arguments cannot swear allegiance to (E), she can, clearly enough, adhere to (E²).

    Pragmatic Arguments for Belief in God

  • H receives a greater increment (or lesser decrement) of evidential support from E than from E* if and only if PE (H) exceeds

    Bayes' Theorem

  • E and E* provide for H is the amount by which the incremental evidence that E provides for H exceeds the incremental evidence that E* provides for

    Bayes' Theorem

  • If H entails both E and E*, say, then Bayes 'Theorem entails that the least probable of the two supports H more strongly.

    Bayes' Theorem

  • H predicts E more strongly than H* does, and (b) ~H predicts ~E more strongly than

    Bayes' Theorem

  • The effective increment of evidence [12] that E provides for H is the amount by which the incremental evidence that E provides for H exceeds the incremental evidence that ~E provides for H.

    Bayes' Theorem

  • E provides more incremental evidence than E* does for H

    Bayes' Theorem

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  • Boy

    January 2, 2010