Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of droop.
  • n. An instance of something drooping
  • adj. That droops or droop.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. weak from exhaustion
  • adj. hanging down (as from exhaustion or weakness)
  • adj. having branches or flower heads that bend downward

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Miles and miles and miles of them, and not a green thing to be seen except the cabbages in the greengrocers 'shops, and here and there some poor trails of creeping-jenny drooping from a dirty window-sill.

    Harding's Luck

  • The long, graceful catkins are drooping from the birches, and the more slender clusters are also in flower on the oaks.

    Rural Hours

  • White blossoms are opening in drooping clusters, also, on the naked branches of the Juneberry; this is a tree which adds very much to the gayety of our spring; it is found in every wood, and always covered with long, pendulous bunches of flowers, whether a small shrub or a large tree.

    Rural Hours

  • Dalbert sprang back, with his thumb still in his mouth, and his sword drooping, scowling darkly at the new-comer.

    The Refugees

  • There the wounded monk leaned against the door-post, his red sword drooping to the floor.

    The Lady of Blossholme

  • Paula called drooping, and even excited alarm in her, lest Flapsy should be going into a decline.

    Modern Broods

  • To wake, to warblej and to woo No Linnet calls his drooping love:

    Ode to the Honourable William Pitt ..

  • She reports that a 45 year old hypnotherapist from Wales named Ray Roberts has been feeding Viagra to the family Xmas tree to prevent it 'drooping'.

    No drooping at the Roberts' this Xmas

  • Mrs. Archer had been born a Newland, and mother and daughter, who were as like as sisters, were both, as people said, ` ` true Newlands ''; tall, pale, and slightly round-shouldered, with long noses, sweet smiles and a kind of drooping distinction like that in certain faded Reynolds portraits.

    The Age of Innocence

  • Mrs. Archer had been born a Newland, and mother and daughter, who were as like as sisters, were both, as people said, “true Newlands”; tall, pale, and slightly round-shouldered, with long noses, sweet smiles and a kind of drooping distinction like that in certain faded Reynolds portraits.

    V. Book I

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