Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Firm reliance on the integrity, ability, or character of a person or thing.
  • n. Custody; care.
  • n. Something committed into the care of another; charge.
  • n. The condition and resulting obligation of having confidence placed in one: violated a public trust.
  • n. One in which confidence is placed.
  • n. Reliance on something in the future; hope.
  • n. Reliance on the intention and ability of a purchaser to pay in the future; credit.
  • n. Law A legal title to property held by one party for the benefit of another.
  • n. Law The confidence reposed in a trustee when giving the trustee legal title to property to administer for another, together with the trustee's obligation regarding that property and the beneficiary.
  • n. Law The property so held.
  • n. A combination of firms or corporations for the purpose of reducing competition and controlling prices throughout a business or an industry.
  • intransitive v. To have or place reliance; depend: Trust in the Lord. Trust to destiny.
  • intransitive v. To be confident; hope.
  • intransitive v. To sell on credit.
  • transitive v. To have or place confidence in; depend on.
  • transitive v. To expect with assurance; assume: I trust that you will be on time.
  • transitive v. To believe: I trust what you say.
  • transitive v. To place in the care of another; entrust.
  • transitive v. To grant discretion to confidently: Can I trust them with the boat?
  • transitive v. To extend credit to.
  • idiom in trust In the possession or care of a trustee.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Confidence in or reliance on some person or quality.
  • n. Dependence upon something in the future; hope.
  • n. Confidence in the future payment for goods or services supplied; credit.
  • n. Trustworthiness, reliability.
  • n. The confidence vested in a person who has legal ownership of a property to manage for the benefit of another.
  • n. A group of businessmen or traders organised for mutual benefit to produce and distribute specific commodities or services, and managed by a central body of trustees.
  • n. : trust from an operating system against an application or user that results in access rights
  • v. To place confidence in; to rely on, to confide, or repose faith, in.
  • v. To give credence to; to believe; to credit.
  • v. To hope confidently; to believe; usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object.
  • v. to show confidence in a person by intrusting (him) with something.
  • v. To commit, as to one's care; to intrust.
  • v. To give credit to; to sell to upon credit, or in confidence of future payment.
  • v. To risk; to venture confidently.
  • v. To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide.
  • v. To be confident, as of something future; to hope.
  • v. To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit.
  • adj. Secure, safe.
  • adj. Faithful, dependable.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Held in trust.
  • n. Assured resting of the mind on the integrity, veracity, justice, friendship, or other sound principle, of another person; confidence; reliance; reliance.
  • n. Credit given; especially, delivery of property or merchandise in reliance upon future payment; exchange without immediate receipt of an equivalent.
  • n. Assured anticipation; dependence upon something future or contingent, as if present or actual; hope; belief.
  • n. That which is committed or intrusted to one; something received in confidence; charge; deposit.
  • n. The condition or obligation of one to whom anything is confided; responsible charge or office.
  • n. That upon which confidence is reposed; ground of reliance; hope.
  • n. An estate devised or granted in confidence that the devisee or grantee shall convey it, or dispose of the profits, at the will, or for the benefit, of another; an estate held for the use of another; a confidence respecting property reposed in one person, who is termed the trustee, for the benefit of another, who is called the cestui que trust.
  • n. An equitable right or interest in property distinct from the legal ownership thereof; a use (as it existed before the Statute of Uses); also, a property interest held by one person for the benefit of another. Trusts are active, or special, express, implied, constructive, etc. In a passive trust the trustee simply has title to the trust property, while its control and management are in the beneficiary.
  • n. A business organization or combination consisting of a number of firms or corporations operating, and often united, under an agreement creating a trust (in sense 1), esp. one formed mainly for the purpose of regulating the supply and price of commodities, etc.; often, opprobriously, a combination formed for the purpose of controlling or monopolizing a trade, industry, or business, by doing acts in restraint or trade. A trust may take the form of a corporation or of a body of persons or corporations acting together by mutual arrangement, as under a contract or a so-called gentlemen's agreement. When it consists of corporations it may be effected by putting a majority of their stock either in the hands of a board of trustees (whence the name trust for the combination) or by transferring a majority to a holding company. The advantages of a trust are partly due to the economies made possible in carrying on a large business, as well as the doing away with competition. In the United States severe statutes against trusts have been passed by the Federal government and in many States, with elaborate statutory definitions.
  • intransitive v. To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide.
  • intransitive v. To be confident, as of something future; to hope.
  • intransitive v. To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit.
  • transitive v. To place confidence in; to rely on, to confide, or repose faith, in.
  • transitive v. To give credence to; to believe; to credit.
  • transitive v. To hope confidently; to believe; -- usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object.
  • transitive v. to show confidence in a person by intrusting (him) with something.
  • transitive v. To commit, as to one's care; to intrust.
  • transitive v. To give credit to; to sell to upon credit, or in confidence of future payment.
  • transitive v. To risk; to venture confidently.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Reliance on the veracity, integrity, justice, friendship, or other virtue or sound principle of another; a firm reliance on promises or on laws or principles; confidence; belief.
  • n. Confident expectation; assured anticipation; dependence upon something future or contingent as if present or actual; hope.
  • n. That on which one relies or in which he confides; ground of reliance, confidence, or hope.
  • n. Credit.
  • n. Confidence in the ability and intention of one who does not pay ready money to pay at some definite or indefinite time in the future: as, to buy or sell on trust.
  • n. In law: A confidence reposed in a person by making him the nominal owner of property which he is to hold, use, or dispose of for the benefit of another.
  • n. The right on the part of such other to enjoy the use or the profits or to require a disposal of the property for his benefit.
  • n. The relation between persons and property which arises when the legal ownership is given to one person, called the trustee, and the beneficial enjoyment or advantages of ownership are given or reserved to another, the cestui que trust or beneficiary.
  • n. That which is committed or intrusted to one, as for safe-keeping or use.
  • n. Something confided to one's faith; a charge given or received in confidence; something which one is bound in duty and in honor to keep inviolate; a duty incumbent on one.
  • n. Specifically, in mod. com. usage, an organization for the control of several corporations under one direction by the device of a transfer by the stockholders in each corporation of at least a majority of the stock to a central committee or board of trustees, who issue in return to such stockholders respectively certificates showing in effect that, although they have parted with their stock and the consequent voting power, they are still entitled to dividends or to share in the profits—the object being to enable the trustees to elect directors in all the corporations, to control and suspend at pleasure the work of any, and thus to economize expenses, regulate production, and defeat competition.
  • n. The state of being confided in and relied on; the state of one to whom something is intrusted.
  • n. The state of being confided to another's care or guard; charge.
  • n. Keeping; care.
  • n. Trustworthiness.
  • n. A trust is also said to be executed when the trustee has performed his entire duty.
  • n. When the instrument creating a trust in land has the effect by virtue of the statute of uses of vesting the entire estate in the intended beneficiary, the trust is said to be executed by the statute.
  • n. A deed conveying property to a creditor in trust to sell and pay himself and restore the residue: a kind of mortgage.
  • n. Synonyms and Faith, credence, assurance, dependence, expectation.
  • Held in trust: as, trust property; trust money.
  • To place or repose confidence in (a person); rely upon; depend upon.
  • To believe; credit; receive with credence, as a statement, assertion, or the like.
  • To intrust: with with before the object confided.
  • To commit, consign, or allow with confidence; permit to be in some place, position, or company, or to do some particular thing, without misgiving or fear of consequences: as, to trust one's self to another's guidance.
  • To give credit to; supply with goods or something of value in the expectation of future payment.
  • To entertain a lively hope; feel sure; expect confidently: followed by a clause.
  • To repose confidence; place faith or reliance; rely: with on or in.
  • To give credit for something due; sell on credit: as, to trust recklessly.
  • An obsolete spelling of trussed, preterit and past participle of truss.
  • n.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. be confident about something
  • n. a consortium of independent organizations formed to limit competition by controlling the production and distribution of a product or service
  • n. complete confidence in a person or plan etc
  • v. have confidence or faith in
  • v. confer a trust upon
  • n. something (as property) held by one party (the trustee) for the benefit of another (the beneficiary)
  • v. extend credit to
  • n. certainty based on past experience
  • v. expect and wish
  • n. the trait of believing in the honesty and reliability of others
  • v. allow without fear
  • n. a trustful relationship

Etymologies

Middle English truste, perhaps from Old Norse traust, confidence; see deru- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle English truste ("trust, protection"), from Old Norse traust ("confidence, help, protection"), from Proto-Germanic *traust-, from Proto-Indo-European *drouzdo-, from Proto-Indo-European *deru- (“be firm, hard, solid”). Akin to Danish trøst, tröst ("trust"), Old Frisian trāst ("trust"), Dutch troost ("comfort, consolation"), Old High German trōst ("trust, fidelity"), German Trost ("comfort, consolation"), Gothic trausti ("alliance, pact"). More at true, tree. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.