Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Not subject to death: immortal deities; the immortal soul.
  • adj. Never to be forgotten; everlasting: immortal words.
  • adj. Of or relating to immortality.
  • adj. Biology Capable of indefinite growth or division. Used of cells in culture.
  • n. One not subject to death.
  • n. One whose fame is enduring.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Not susceptible to death; living forever; never dying.
  • adj. Never to be forgotten; that merits being always remembered.
  • n. One who is not susceptible to death.
  • n. A member of an elite regiment of the Persian army.
  • n. A member of the Académie française.
  • n. An administrator of a multi-user dungeon; a wizard.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Not mortal; exempt from liability to die; undying; imperishable; lasting forever; having unlimited, or eternal, existance.
  • adj. Connected with, or pertaining to immortality.
  • adj. Destined to live in all ages of this world; abiding; exempt from oblivion; imperishable.
  • adj. Great; excessive; grievous.
  • n. One who will never cease to be; one exempt from death, decay, or annihilation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not mortal; not liable or subject to death; having unlimited existence; undying.
  • Hence Unceasing; inextinguishable; imperishable; destined to endure for all time: as, immortal hopes; immortal fame.
  • Indefatigable; unchanging.
  • Synonyms Perpetual, Everlasting, etc. (see eternal); incorruptible, deathless, enduring, unfading.
  • n. One who is immortal, or exempt from death or annihilation.
  • n. One of the gods of classical mythology: usually in the plural.
  • n. The name of the royal guard of ancient Persia, the members of which were magnificently equipped and numerously attended.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. not subject to death
  • n. a person (such as an author) of enduring fame
  • n. any supernatural being worshipped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French immortel, from Latin immortālis; see mer- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin immortālis, from prefix im- ("not"), from in-, + mortālis ("mortal"), from mors ("death") (combining form mort-), + adjectival suffix -alis. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • My immortals cannot be killed (hence the term immortal and it's explained in the story) but life can become uncomfortable for them (also explained in the story) so they still have rudimentary towns and such for social interaction, trade, and comfort.

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  • The part of them worthy of the name immortal, which is called divine and is the guiding principle of those who are willing to follow justice and you — of that divine part I will myself sow the seed, and having made a beginning, I will hand the work over to you.

    Timaeus

  • He saw a chance to perform a great service and make his name immortal.

    How to Win Friends and Influence People

  • The part of them worthy of the name immortal, which is called divine and is the guiding principle of those who are willing to follow justice and you-of that divine part I will myself sow the seed, and having made a beginning, I will hand the work over to you.

    TIMAEUS

  • The part of them worthy of the name immortal, which is called divine and is the guiding principle of those who are willing to follow justice and you -- of that divine part I will myself sow the seed, and having made a beginning, I will hand the work over to you.

    Timaeus

  • To illustrate how few people actually read its terms and conditions disclosure, the online retailer Gamestation, on April Fools' Day 2010, replaced the usual text with what it called an "immortal soul clause," which read: "By placing an order via this Web site on the first day of the fourth month of the year 2010 anno Domini, you agree to grant us a non-transferable option to claim, for now and forever more, your immortal soul."

    NYT > Home Page

  • The very nature of the immortal is that they bind the elsewhen of the past to the here-and-now; their very life is a seam running through reality.

    Notes on Strange Fiction: Seams

  • He found another passage in the book and read aloud, “‘If any creature could be called immortal it is the insect, which inhabited the earth millions of years before the advent of mammals and which will be here on earth long after intelligent life has vanished.’”

    A Lincoln Rhyme eBook Boxed Set

  • Therefore, to be immortal is to be, first of all, invulnerable and in the case of the corporation, incapable of being grieviously wounded by external economic or political pressures.

    Energy—a Sign of Future Tension

  • Cicero; he will stop but a short time, and will pass over to Asia Minor and its cities, before he returns to continue a career which will render his name immortal; and he will like his short sojourn at Athens so well, that he will take good care to send his son thither at an earlier age than he visited it himself.

    Harvard Classics Volume 28 Essays English and American

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Comments

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  • I always think of the Hugo award winning novel "This Immortal" by Roger Zelazny, although he peculiarly prefers the original title, "And Call Me Conrad".

    April 23, 2009

  • the immortal thirst for beauty has always found its satisfaction...

    -Charles Baudelaire

    April 22, 2009