Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To look angry, sullen, or threatening. See Synonyms at frown.
  • intransitive v. To appear dark or threatening, as the sky.
  • n. A threatening, sullen, or angry look.
  • n. A dark and ominous look: the lower of thunderheads.
  • adj. Below another in rank, position, or authority.
  • adj. Physically situated below a similar or comparable thing: a lower shelf.
  • adj. Geology & Archaeology Relating to or being an earlier or older division of the period named.
  • adj. Biology Less advanced in organization or evolutionary development.
  • adj. Denoting the larger and usually more representative house of a bicameral legislature.
  • transitive v. To let, bring, or move down to a lower level.
  • transitive v. To reduce in value, degree, or quality.
  • transitive v. To weaken; undermine: lower one's energy.
  • transitive v. To reduce in standing or respect.
  • intransitive v. To move down: Her hand lowered.
  • intransitive v. To become less; diminish: The temperature has lowered gradually this month.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. comparative form of low: more low
  • adv. comparative form of low: more low
  • v. To let descend by its own weight, as something suspended; to let down
  • v. to pull down
  • v. To reduce the height of
  • v. To depress as to direction
  • v. To make less elevated
  • v. To reduce the degree, intensity, strength, etc., of
  • v. To bring down; to humble
  • v. (lower oneself) To humble oneself; to do something one considers to be beneath one's dignity.
  • v. To reduce (something) in value, amount, etc.
  • v. To fall; to sink; to grow less; to diminish; to decrease
  • v. To decrease in value, amount, etc.
  • v. To be dark, gloomy, and threatening, as clouds; to be covered with dark and threatening clouds, as the sky; to show threatening signs of approach, as a tempest.
  • v. To frown; to look sullen.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Compar. of low, a.
  • n. Cloudiness; gloominess.
  • n. A frowning; sullenness.
  • adj. relating to small or noncapital letters which were kept in the lower half of a compositor's type case.
  • intransitive v. To fall; to sink; to grow less; to diminish; to decrease.
  • intransitive v. To be dark, gloomy, and threatening, as clouds; to be covered with dark and threatening clouds, as the sky; to show threatening signs of approach, as a tempest.
  • intransitive v. To frown; to look sullen.
  • transitive v. To let descend by its own weight, as something suspended; to let down; ; sometimes, to pull down.
  • transitive v. To reduce the height of
  • transitive v. To depress as to direction; ; to make less elevated as to object.
  • transitive v. To reduce the degree, intensity, strength, etc., of
  • transitive v. To bring down; to humble.
  • transitive v. To reduce in value, amount, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To frown; scowl; look sullen; watch in sullen silence.
  • To appear dark or gloomy; be clouded; threaten a storm.
  • To look bad; appear in bad condition.
  • To lurk; crouch; skulk.
  • To strike, as a clock, with a low prolonged sound; toll the curfew.
  • To cause to descend; let down; take or bring down: as, to lower the sail of a ship; to lower cargo into the hold.
  • To reduce or bring down, as in height, amount, value, estimation, condition, degree, etc.; make low or lower: as, to lower a wall (by removing a part of the top); to lower the water in a canal (by allowing some to run off); to lower the temperature of a room or the quality of goods; to lower the point of a spear or the muzzle of a gun; to lower prices or the rate of interest.
  • To bring down in spirit; humble; humiliate: as, to lower one's pride; to lower one in the estimation of others.
  • In relief-engraving
  • to scrape or cut away, as the surface of a block, in such manner as to leave it highest in the middle; or
  • to depress, as any part of the surface which it is desired shall print lightly from being exposed to a diminished pressure.
  • In music, to change from a high to a low pitch; specifically, in musical notation, to depress; flat: said of changing the significance of a staff-degree or of a note on such a degree by attaching a flat to it either in the signature or as an accidental.
  • To fall; sink; grow less; become lower in any way.
  • n. A frown; scowl; frowning; sullenness.
  • n. Cloudiness; gloominess.
  • n. Hire; reward.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. cause to drop or sink
  • v. look angry or sullen, wrinkle one's forehead, as if to signal disapproval
  • v. set lower
  • v. move something or somebody to a lower position
  • v. make lower or quieter
  • n. the lower of two berths

Etymologies

Middle English louren.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From low + -er ("comparative") (Wiktionary)
Old English lowren, luren; Compare Dutch loeren, Late German luren. German lauern ("to lurk, to be on the watch"), and English leer, lurk. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • And as it gets hold of you it crowds your mind and heart and life till every other is either crowded out, or crowded to a lower place; _out_, if it jars; _lower place_, if it agrees, for every agreeing bit yields to the lead of this tremendous message.

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  • Journalists, for example, generally describe all but the very rich Age differences playa fundamental role in shaping the values and poor as middle class and the working class as lower middle of middle Americans simply because security, control, comfort, class. 13 and convenience have different meanings and priorities at all A generation or two ago the notion of a combined lower­ stages in the life cycle.

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  • If you choose a name lower on the list, your child is less likely to share that name with a classmate.

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  • She had not learnt that those innocents, pushed by an excessive love of pleasure, are for the term lower in the scale than their wary darker cousins, and must come to the diviner light of intelligence through suffering.

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  • Rick Perry asserted that Texas has benefited from policies of "freedom," which he described as lower taxes, getting rid of government regulations, and cutting spending.

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  • You donate money to what you call the lower class.

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  • Operations had also disrupted what he called lower and mid-level Taliban commanders.

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  • She negotiated with the oil companies and faced them down, a $40 billion pipeline of natural gas that's going to relieve the energy needs of the United -- of what they call the lower 48.

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  • As you can see, this is what we call our lower middle west (ph) sector and you see, we've got Baton Rouge here and most the sand boils are here.

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  • Charan grew up in what he describes as a lower-middle-class household in India, sharing his home with his parents, six siblings, six cousins, an aunt and an uncle.

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Comments

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  • Take down a peg; glower.

    November 22, 2007

  • intransitive verb: to be dark and threatening; also lour. noun: an angry or threatening look

    August 1, 2007