Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To restore to sound condition after damage or injury; fix: repaired the broken watch.
  • transitive v. To set right; remedy: repair an oversight.
  • transitive v. To renew or revitalize.
  • transitive v. To make up for or compensate for (a loss or wrong, for example).
  • intransitive v. To make repairs.
  • n. The work, act, or process of repairing.
  • n. An instance or a result of repairing. Often used in the plural: My car is in the shop for repairs. We checked the repairs before returning his car.
  • n. General condition after use or repairing: in good repair.
  • n. Something that has been repaired.
  • intransitive v. To betake oneself; go: repair to the dining room.
  • intransitive v. To go frequently or habitually: repairs to the restaurant every week.
  • n. An act of going or sojourning: our annual repair to the mountains.
  • n. A place to which one goes frequently or habitually; a haunt.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of repairing something.
  • n. The result of repairing something.
  • n. The condition of something, in respect of need for repair.
  • v. To restore to good working order, fix, or improve damaged condition; to mend; to remedy.
  • n. An act of going on vacation.
  • n. A place to which one goes frequently or habitually; a haunt.
  • v. To transfer oneself to another place.
  • v. to pair again

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of repairing or resorting to a place.
  • n. Place to which one repairs; a haunt; a resort.
  • n. Restoration to a sound or good state after decay, waste, injury, or partial restruction; supply of loss; reparation.
  • n. Condition with respect to soundness, perfectness, etc.
  • intransitive v. To return.
  • intransitive v. To go; to betake one's self; to resort; ass, to repair to sanctuary for safety.
  • transitive v. To restore to a sound or good state after decay, injury, dilapidation, or partial destruction; to renew; to restore; to mend.
  • transitive v. To make amends for, as for an injury, by an equivalent; to indemnify for.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To restore to a sound, good, or complete state after decay, injury, dilapidation, or partial destruction; restore; renovate.
  • To make amends for, as for an injury, by an equivalent; give indemnity for; make good: as, to repair a loss or damage.
  • To fortify; defend.
  • To recover, or get into position for offense again, as a weapon.
  • Synonyms To mend, refit, retouch, vamp (up), patch, tinker (up).
  • To go to a (specified) place; betake one's self; resort: as, to repair to a sanctuary for safety.
  • To return.
  • n. Restoration to a sound or good state after decay, waste, injury, or partial destruction; supply of loss; reparation.
  • n. Good or sound condition kept up by repairing as required; with a qualifying term, condition as regards repairing: as, a building in good or bad repair.
  • n. Reparation for wrong; amends.
  • n. Attire; apparel.
  • n. The act of betaking one's self to a (specified) place; a resorting.
  • n. A place to which one repairs; haunt; resort.
  • n. Probably, an invitation or a return.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a frequently visited place
  • n. a formal way of referring to the condition of something
  • v. set straight or right
  • v. move, travel, or proceed toward some place
  • v. give new life or energy to
  • v. restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken
  • v. make amends for; pay compensation for
  • n. the act of putting something in working order again

Etymologies

Middle English reparen, repairen, from Old French reparer, from Latin reparāre : re-, re- + parāre, to prepare, put in order; see perə-1 in Indo-European roots.
Middle English repairen, to return, from Old French repairier, from Late Latin repatriāre, to return to one's country; see repatriate.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Coined between 1300 and 1350 from Middle English repairen, from Middle French reparer, from Latin reparō ("renew, repair"). (Wiktionary)
Middle English repairen ("to return"), from Old French repairier, from Late Latin repatrire ("to return to one's country"), from re- + patria ("homeland"). Cognate to repatriate. (Wiktionary)
From re- +‎ pair. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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