Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Firm but easily broken or crumbled; brittle: crisp potato chips.
  • adj. Pleasingly firm and fresh: crisp carrot and celery sticks.
  • adj. Bracing; invigorating: crisp mountain air.
  • adj. Lively; sprightly: music with a crisp rhythm.
  • adj. Conspicuously clean or new: a crisp dollar bill.
  • adj. Marked by clarity, conciseness, and briskness: a crisp reply. See Synonyms at incisive.
  • adj. Having small curls, waves, or ripples.
  • transitive v. To make or keep crisp.
  • intransitive v. To become or remain crisp.
  • n. Something crisp or easily crumbled: The roast was burned to a crisp.
  • n. A dessert of fruit baked with a sweet crumbly topping: apple crisp.
  • n. Chiefly British A potato chip.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Sharp, clearly defined.
  • adj. Curling in stiff curls or ringlets; as, crisp hair.
  • adj. Curled with a ripple of water.
  • adj. Brittle; friable; in a condition to break with a short, sharp fracture; as, crisp snow.
  • adj. Possessing a certain degree of firmness and freshness; in a fresh, unwilted condition.
  • adj. Of weather, air etc.: dry and cold.
  • adj. Quick and accurate.
  • adj. Brief and to the point. (Esp. in make it crisp.)
  • adj. Lively; sparking; effervescing.
  • adj. Brisk; crackling; cheerful; lively.
  • adj. Of wine: having a refreshing amount of acidity; having less acidity than green wine, but more than a flabby one.
  • n. A thin slice of fried potato eaten as a snack.
  • v. To make crisp.
  • v. To become crisp.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Curling in stiff curls or ringlets.
  • adj. Curled with the ripple of the water.
  • adj. Brittle; friable; in a condition to break with a short, sharp fracture.
  • adj. Possessing a certain degree of firmness and freshness; in a fresh, unwilted condition.
  • adj. Lively; sparking; effervescing.
  • adj. Brisk; crackling; cheerful; lively.
  • n. That which is crisp or brittle; the state of being crisp or brittle; ; specifically, the rind of roasted pork; crackling.
  • intransitive v. To undulate or ripple. Cf. crisp, v. t.
  • transitive v. To curl; to form into ringlets, as hair, or the nap of cloth; to interweave, as the branches of trees.
  • transitive v. To cause to undulate irregularly, as crape or water; to wrinkle; to cause to ripple. Cf. Crimp.
  • transitive v. To make crisp or brittle, as in cooking.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Curled; crimpled; crimped; wrinkled; wavy; especially (of the hair), curling in small stiff or firm curls.
  • In botany, curled and twisted: applied to a leaf when the border is much more dilated than the disk.
  • Twisted; twisting; winding.
  • Brittle; friable; breaking or crumbling into fragments of somewhat firm consistence.
  • Possessing a certain degree of firmness and vigor; fresh; having a fresh appearance.
  • Brisk; lively.
  • Having a sharp, pleasantly acrid taste.
  • Lively in expression; pithy; terse; sparkling.
  • In entomology, same as crispate.
  • n. A material formerly used for veils, probably similar to crape; a veil.
  • n. Same as crespine. Planché.
  • To curl; twist; contract or form into waves or ringlets, as the hair; wreathe or interweave, as the branches of trees.
  • To wrinkle or curl into little undulations; crimp; ripple; corrugate; pucker: as, to crisp cloth.
  • To form little curls or undulations; curl.
  • To become friable; crackle.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make wrinkles or creases on a smooth surface; make a pressed, folded or wrinkled line in
  • n. a thin crisp slice of potato fried in deep fat
  • adj. (of something seen or heard) clearly defined
  • adj. pleasingly firm and fresh
  • adj. brief and to the point; effectively cut short
  • adj. pleasantly cold and invigorating
  • adj. (of hair) in small tight curls
  • adj. tender and brittle
  • v. make brown and crisp by heating

Etymologies

Middle English, curly, from Old English, from Latin crispus; see sker-2 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English crisp ("curly"), from Old English crisp ("curly"), from Latin crispus ("curly") (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • “A deep-dish fruit dessert made with a crumb or streusel topping and baked.”

    Ochef.com, Cobbler, Crisp, Crumble, Grunt, Slump—You Get the Picture

    April 6, 2010

  • Onomotopoeia.

    August 4, 2009

  • 'curled', 'turning' and 'winding' was a meaning of crisp in the 16th century. from the indo-european root sker- turn, bend

    March 28, 2009

  • See crumble

    February 6, 2008

  • Looks like the joke's on all the rest of us. (:

    June 28, 2007

  • Well, you're not alone. I was thinking of apple crisp all along--nothing more. :-)

    June 27, 2007

  • Oh dear, I shoulda known better. I wondered why "crisp" was suddenly so hip--why were so many people listing it. The answer was in the Urban Dictionary: evidently it is used to mean awsome, cool, or something like that. So I was trying to make a joke. Best I had stick to my own outdated slanguage.

    June 27, 2007

  • As far as I'm concerned, the texture of the apples isn't really the point - it is all about the crunchy, crackly goodness that is the streusel on top. mmmmmmmmmm!

    June 27, 2007

  • Hmm. True, amcd. Either I've not had the right kind of apple crisp or apple crisp really isn't crisp. Still tastes good, though. Yum.

    June 27, 2007

  • apple crisp - I would say that is yummy, but not crisp

    June 27, 2007

  • Apple crisp, that's crisp.

    June 27, 2007