Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The quality or condition of being contrary.
  • n. Something that is contrary.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Opposition or contrariness; cross-purposes, marked contrast.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The state or quality of being contrary; opposition; repugnance; disagreement; antagonism.
  • n. Something which is contrary to, or inconsistent with, something else; an inconsistency.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or quality of being contrary; extreme opposition; the relation of the greatest unlikeness within the same class.
  • n. Something contrary to or extremely unlike another; a contrary.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the relation between contraries

Etymologies

From Middle French contrariété, from Late Latin contrarietas, from contrarius, from contra ("against"). Compare contrary. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Another partial of oral which Cleopatra never struggled with a dignified question, in contrariety to Antony, a some-more substantial figure.

    Archive 2009-11-01

  • "has no substantial being, but is an acting in contrariety to the being formed in us" [Theophylact].

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • They are dim with bloodlust, blind with hate and mired in contrariety.

    How Do Y0u Solve A Problem Like Sharia

  • Divine providence does not determine a free will to one part of a contradiction or contrariety, that is, by a determination preceding the actual volition itself; under other circumstances the concurrence of the very volition with the will is the concomitant cause, and thus determines the will with the volition itself, by an act which is not previous but simultaneous, as the schoolmen express themselves.

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2

  • But this is the most genuinely gracious fear of sin, when we dread the defilement of it, and that contrariety which is in it to the holiness of God.

    Pneumatologia

  • Why assume "contrariety" and "disorder" in a kosmos which seems to have had no experience of either?

    Inspiration and Interpretation: Seven Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford: With Preliminary Remarks: Being an Answer to a Volume Entitled "Essays and Reviews."

  • Concerning the contrariety that arises from carnal corruption, it is expressed in the scripture by the greatest that can be, namely, that contrariety which is between enemies; yea, and such an one as breaks out into an open war: I have a law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and leading me captive into the law of sin, Rom. vii.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. VI.

  • By this means there arises a kind of contrariety in our method of thinking, from the different points of view, in which we survey the object, and from the nearness or remoteness of those instants of time, which we compare together.

    A treatise of human nature

  • And principles, which in their nature have no kind of contrariety or affinity, may yet accidentally be each other's allays or incentives.

    Human Nature and Other Sermons

  • But our comedians think there is no delight without laughter, which is very wrong; for though laughter may come with delight, yet cometh it not of delight, as though delight should be the cause of laughter; but well may one thing breed both together: nay, rather in themselves, they have as it were a kind of contrariety: for delight we scarcely do, but in things that have a convenience to ourselves, or to the general nature: laughter almost ever cometh of things most disproportioned to ourselves and nature.

    English literary criticism

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Comments

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  • "MENENIUS: This is unlikely:
    He and Aufidius can no more atone
    Than violentest contrariety."
    - William Shakespeare, 'The Tragedy of Coriolanus'.

    August 29, 2009

  • Bahaha, WeirdNet!

    August 29, 2009