Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To cause to conform or agree; bring into harmony.
  • transitive v. To grant, especially as being due or appropriate: accorded the President the proper deference.
  • transitive v. To bestow upon: I accord you my blessing.
  • intransitive v. To be in agreement, unity, or harmony. See Synonyms at agree.
  • n. Agreement; harmony: act in accord with university policies.
  • n. A settlement or compromise of conflicting opinions.
  • n. A settlement of points at issue between nations.
  • n. Spontaneous or voluntary desire to take a certain action: The children returned on their own accord. He confessed of his own accord.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Agreement or concurrence of opinion, will, or action.
  • n. A harmony in sound, pitch and tone; concord.
  • n. Agreement or harmony of things in general.
  • n. An agreement between parties in controversy, by which satisfaction for an injury is stipulated, and which, when executed, prevents a lawsuit.
  • n. An international agreement.
  • n. Assent
  • n. Voluntary or spontaneous impulse to act.
  • v. To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust.
  • v. To bring (people) to an agreement; to reconcile, settle, adjust or harmonize.
  • v. To agree or correspond; to be in harmony.
  • v. To agree in pitch and tone.
  • v. To grant as suitable or proper; to concede or award.
  • v. To give consent.
  • v. To arrive at an agreement.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Agreement or concurrence of opinion, will, or action; harmony of mind; consent; assent.
  • n. Harmony of sounds; agreement in pitch and tone; concord.
  • n. Agreement, harmony, or just correspondence of things.
  • n. Voluntary or spontaneous motion or impulse to act; -- preceded by own.
  • n. An agreement between parties in controversy, by which satisfaction for an injury is stipulated, and which, when executed, bars a suit.
  • intransitive v. To agree; to correspond; to be in harmony; -- followed by with, formerly also by to.
  • intransitive v. To agree in pitch and tone.
  • transitive v. To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust; -- followed by to.
  • transitive v. To bring to an agreement, as persons; to reconcile; to settle, adjust, harmonize, or compose, as things.
  • transitive v. To grant as suitable or proper; to concede; to award.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To agree; be in correspondence or harmony.
  • To make an agreement; come to an understanding.
  • To make to agree or correspond; adapt, as one thing to another.
  • To bring to an agreement or a settlement; settle, adjust, or compose; reconcile: as, to accord controversies.
  • To grant; give; concede: as, to accord due praise to any one.
  • n. Agreement; harmony of minds; consent or concurrence of opinions or wills; assent.
  • n. A union of different sounds which is agreeable to the ear; concord; harmony.
  • n. Agreement; just correspondence of things; harmony of relation: as, the accord of light and shade in painting.
  • n. Will; voluntary or spontaneous impulse or act; unaided action or operation: preceded by own.
  • n. Adjustment of a difference; reconciliation: as, the mediator of an accord.
  • n. Specifically, in law, an agreement which is made between parties for the settlement of a liability or controversy, and which, when executed, that is, carried into effect, is termed an accord and satisfaction, and bars or terminates a suit; a private extra-judicial agreement or arrangement.
  • n. In music, same as chord.
  • n. Milit., the conditions under which a fortress or command of troops is surrendered.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a written agreement between two states or sovereigns
  • n. sympathetic compatibility
  • v. go together
  • n. concurrence of opinion
  • n. harmony of people's opinions or actions or characters
  • v. allow to have

Etymologies

Middle English accorden, from Old French acorder, from Medieval Latin accordāre, to bring into agreement : Latin ad-, ad- + Latin cor, cord-, heart; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

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