Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A man or boy.
  • n. Informal A boyfriend.
  • n. A comrade or associate.
  • n. A person of equal rank, position, or background; a peer.
  • n. One of a pair; a mate: found the lost shoe and its fellow.
  • n. A member of a learned society.
  • n. A graduate student appointed to a position granting financial aid and providing for further study.
  • n. Chiefly British An incorporated senior member of certain colleges and universities.
  • n. Chiefly British A member of the governing body of certain colleges and universities.
  • n. Obsolete A person of a lower social class.
  • adj. Being of the same kind, group, occupation, society, or locality; having in common certain characteristics or interests: fellow workers.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A colleague or partner.
  • n. A companion; a comrade.
  • n. A man without good breeding or worth; an ignoble or mean man.
  • n. An equal in power, rank, character, etc.
  • n. One of a pair, or of two things used together or suited to each other; a mate.
  • n. A male person; a man.
  • n. In the English universities, a scholar who is appointed to a foundation called a fellowship, which gives a title to certain perquisites and privileges.
  • n. In an American college or university, a member of the corporation which manages its business interests; also, a graduate appointed to a fellowship, who receives the income of the foundation.
  • n. A member of a literary or scientific society; as, a Fellow of the Royal Society.
  • n. The most senior rank or title one can achieve on a technical career in certain companies (though some fellows also hold business titles such as vice president or chief technology officer). This is typically found in large corporations in research and development-intensive industries (IBM or Sun Microsystems in information technology, and Boston Scientific in Medical Devices for example). They appoint a small number of senior scientists and engineers as Fellows.
  • n. In the US and Canada, a physician who is undergoing a supervised, sub-specialty medical training (fellowship) after completing a specialty training program (residency).
  • adj. Having common characteristics; being of the same kind, or in the same group
  • v. To suit with; to pair with; to match.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A companion; a comrade; an associate; a partner; a sharer.
  • n. A man without good breeding or worth; an ignoble or mean man.
  • n. An equal in power, rank, character, etc.
  • n. One of a pair, or of two things used together or suited to each other; a mate; the male.
  • n. A person; an individual.
  • n. In the English universities, a scholar who is appointed to a foundation called a fellowship, which gives a title to certain perquisites and privileges.
  • n. In an American college or university, a member of the corporation which manages its business interests; also, a graduate appointed to a fellowship, who receives the income of the foundation.
  • n. A member of a literary or scientific society.
  • transitive v. To suit with; to pair with; to match.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To make one's fellow; companion with.
  • To suit with; pair with; match.
  • n. A companion; comrade; mate.
  • n. One of the same kind; one of like character or qualities; an equal; a peer or compeer.
  • n. One of a pair; one of two things mated or fitted to each other; a mate or match.
  • n. A masculine mate: applied to beasts.
  • n. In a particular sense, a boon companion; a pleasant, genial associate; a jovial comrade; a man of easy manners and lively disposition: often with the epithet good.
  • n. A person in general; an individual: generally used in friendly familiarity of a man, and sometimes humorously of a woman.
  • n. A man; a boy; one, in the sense of ‘a person’: in vulgar parlance, commonly applied by the speaker to himself: as, give a fellow a chance; don't be hard on a fellow.
  • n. A person of trivial or disreputable character; a man of no esteem: said in contempt.
  • n. In England, a graduate member of a college who shares its revenues. See fellowship, 5 .
  • n. A full member of an incorporated literary or scientific society.
  • n. In the United States:
  • n. One of the trustees or a member of the corporation of some colleges.
  • n. The name sometimes given to the holder of a fellowship.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a friend who is frequently in the company of another
  • n. one of a pair
  • n. a person who is member of one's class or profession
  • n. a member of a learned society
  • n. an informal form of address for a man
  • n. a boy or man
  • n. a man who is the lover of a girl or young woman

Etymologies

Middle English felau, from Old English fēolaga, from Old Norse fēlagi, business partner, fellow, from fēlag, partnership : , property, money; + lag, a laying down.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old Norse fēlagi, from the Germanic bases of two words represented in English by fee and lay. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • "The name sometimes given to the holder of a fellowship. (Used in composition, fellow denotes community in nature, station, interest, or employment, or mutual association on equal or friendly terms: as, fellow-boarder, fellow-clerk, fellow-guest, fellow-passenger, fellow-pilgrim, fellow-prisoner, fellow-servant, fellow-sinner, fellow-student, fellow-sufferer, fellow-townsman, fellow-traveler, fellow-worker. For other examples, see below.)" --CD&C

    April 13, 2012


  • You and I together—
    Was it so?
    In the August weather
    Long ago!
    Did we kiss and fellow,
    Side by side,
    Till the sunbeams quickened
    From our stalks great yellow
    Sunflowers, till we sickened
    There and died?

    - Richard Hovey, 'Launa Dee'.

    September 16, 2009