Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Extending far downward below a surface: a deep hole in the river ice.
  • adj. Extending far inward from an outer surface: a deep cut.
  • adj. Extending far backward from front to rear: a deep walk-in refrigerator.
  • adj. Extending far from side to side from a center: a deep yard surrounding the house.
  • adj. Far distant down or in: deep in the woods.
  • adj. Coming from or penetrating to a depth: a deep sigh.
  • adj. Sports Located or taking place near the outer boundaries of the area of play: deep left field.
  • adj. Extending a specific distance in a given direction: snow four feet deep.
  • adj. Far distant in time or space: deep in the past.
  • adj. Difficult to penetrate or understand; recondite: a deep metaphysical theory.
  • adj. Of a mysterious or obscure nature: a deep secret; ancient and deep tribal rites.
  • adj. Very learned or intellectual; wise: a deep philosopher.
  • adj. Exhibiting great cunning or craft: deep political machinations.
  • adj. Of a grave or extreme nature: deep trouble; deepest deceit.
  • adj. Very absorbed or involved: deep in thought; deep in financial difficulties.
  • adj. Profound in quality or feeling: a deep trance; deep devotion.
  • adj. Rich and intense in shade. Used of a color: a deep red.
  • adj. Low in pitch; resonant: a deep voice.
  • adj. Covered or surrounded to a designated degree. Often used in combination: waist-deep in the water; ankle-deep in snow.
  • adj. Large in quantity or size; big: deep cuts in the budget.
  • adj. Sports Having a sufficient number of capable reserve players: That team is not very deep.
  • adv. To a great depth; deeply: dig deep; feelings that run deep.
  • adv. Well along in time; late: worked deep into the night.
  • adv. Sports Close to the outer boundaries of the area of play: played deep for the first three innings; ran deep into their opponents' territory.
  • n. A deep place in land or in a body of water: drowned in the deep of the river.
  • n. A vast, immeasurable extent: the deep of outer space.
  • n. The extent of encompassing time or space; firmament.
  • n. The most intense or extreme part: the deep of night.
  • n. The ocean.
  • n. Nautical A distance estimated in fathoms between successive marks on a sounding line.
  • idiom deep down At bottom; basically: Deep down, she was still a rebel.
  • idiom in deep water In difficulty.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having its bottom far down.
  • adj. Profound, having great meaning or import, but possibly obscure or not obvious.
  • adj. To a significant, not superficial, extent.
  • adj. In extent in a direction away from the observer.
  • adj. In a number of rows or layers:
  • adj. Thick.
  • adj. Voluminous.
  • adj. Low in pitch.
  • adj. Dark and highly saturated.
  • adj. A long way inside; situated far in or back.
  • adj. Sound, heavy (describing a state of sleep from which one is not easily awoken)
  • adj. Immersed, submerged (in).
  • adv. deeply
  • n. (meaning 1 above) part of a lake, sea, etc.
  • n. (rare) The deep (meaning 2 above) part of a problem.
  • n. : the sea, the ocean
  • n. A fielding position near the boundary.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Extending far below the surface; of great perpendicular dimension (measured from the surface downward, and distinguished from high, which is measured upward); far to the bottom; having a certain depth.
  • adj. Extending far back from the front or outer part; of great horizontal dimension (measured backward from the front or nearer part, mouth, etc.)
  • adj. Low in situation; lying far below the general surface.
  • adj. Hard to penetrate or comprehend; profound; -- opposed to shallow or superficial; intricate; mysterious; not obvious; obscure.
  • adj. Of penetrating or far-reaching intellect; not superficial; thoroughly skilled; sagacious; cunning.
  • adj. Profound; thorough; complete; unmixed; intense; heavy; heartfelt
  • adj. Strongly colored; dark; intense; not light or thin.
  • adj. Of low tone; full-toned; not high or sharp; grave; heavy.
  • adj. Muddy; boggy; sandy; -- said of roads.
  • adv. To a great depth; with depth; far down; profoundly; deeply.
  • n. That which is deep, especially deep water, as the sea or ocean; an abyss; a great depth.
  • n. That which is profound, not easily fathomed, or incomprehensible; a moral or spiritual depth or abyss.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having considerable or great extension downward, or in a direction viewed as analogous with downward.
  • As measured from the point of view: extending far above; lofty: as, a deep sky.
  • As measured from without inward: extending or entering far within; situated far within or toward the center.
  • As measured from the front backward: long: as, a deep house; a deep lot.
  • Having (a certain) extension as measured from the surface downward or from the front backward: as, a mine 1,000 feet deep; a case 12 inches long and 3 inches deep; a house 40 feet deep; a file of soldiers six deep.
  • Immersed; absorbed; engrossed; wholly occupied: as,deep in figures.
  • Closely involved or implicated.
  • Hard to get to the bottom or foundation of; difficult to penetrate or understand; not easily fathomed; profound; abstruse.
  • Sagacious; penetrating; profound: as, a man of deep insight.
  • Artful; contriving; plotting; insidious; designing: as, he is a deep schemer.
  • Grave in sound; low in pitch: as, the deep tones of an organ.
  • Great in degree; intense; extreme; profound: as, deep silence; deep darkness; deep grief; a deep black.
  • Muddy; boggy; having much loose sand or soil: applied to roads.
  • Heartfelt; earnest; affecting.
  • Profound; thorough.
  • Late; advanced in time.
  • In logic, signifying much; having many predicates. See depth, 9.
  • n. That which is of great depth. Specifically
  • n. plural A deep channel near a town: as, Memel Deeps, Prussia; Boston Deeps, near Boston, England.
  • n. A name given by geographers to well-marked depressions in the ocean-bed greater than two thousand fathoms.
  • n. The sky; the unclouded heavens.
  • n. In coal-mining, the lowest part of the mine, especially the portion lower than the bottom of the shaft, or the levels extending therefrom.
  • n. Any abyss.
  • n. Nautical, the distance in fathoms between two successive marks on a lead-line: used in announcing soundings when the depth is greater than the mark under water and less than the one above it: as, by the deep 4. See lead-line.
  • n. That which is too profound or vast to be fathomed or comprehended; a profound mystery.
  • n. Depth; distance downward or outward.
  • n. The middle point; the point of greatest intensity; the culmination.
  • Deeply.
  • To become deep; deepen.
  • To go deep; sink.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. strong; intense
  • n. a long steep-sided depression in the ocean floor
  • adj. relatively deep or strong; affecting one deeply
  • adj. very distant in time or space
  • adj. exhibiting great cunning usually with secrecy
  • adj. large in quantity or size
  • adv. to a great depth;far down
  • adj. extreme
  • adj. difficult to penetrate; incomprehensible to one of ordinary understanding or knowledge
  • adj. of an obscure nature
  • adv. to an advanced time
  • adj. having great spatial extension or penetration downward or inward from an outer surface or backward or laterally or outward from a center; sometimes used in combination
  • adj. relatively thick from top to bottom
  • adv. to a great distance
  • adj. marked by depth of thinking
  • adj. with head or back bent low
  • adj. having or denoting a low vocal or instrumental range
  • adj. extending relatively far inward
  • adj. (of darkness) very intense
  • n. literary term for an ocean
  • n. the central and most intense or profound part

Etymologies

Middle English dep, from Old English dēop; see dheub- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English depe, from Old English dēop ("deep, profound; awful, mysterious; heinous; serious, solemn, earnest; extreme, great"), from Proto-Germanic *deupaz (“deep”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewb- (“deep”). Cognate with Scots depe ("deep"), Eastern Frisian djap ("deep"), West Frisian djip ("deep"), Dutch diep ("deep"), German tief ("deep"), Swedish djup ("deep"), Icelandic djúpur ("deep"), Lithuanian dubùs ("deep, hollow"), Albanian det ("sea"), Welsh dwfn ("deep"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • Peed in reverse.

    August 7, 2007

  • And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.

    August 7, 2007