Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Holding or tending to hold persistently to something, such as a point of view.
  • adj. Holding together firmly; cohesive: a tenacious material.
  • adj. Clinging to another object or surface; adhesive: tenacious lint.
  • adj. Tending to retain; retentive: a tenacious memory.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. clinging to an object or surface; adhesive
  • adj. unwilling to yield or give up; dogged
  • adj. holding together; cohesive
  • adj. having a good memory; retentive

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Holding fast, or inclined to hold fast; inclined to retain what is in possession.
  • adj. Apt to retain; retentive.
  • adj. Having parts apt to adhere to each other; cohesive; tough.
  • adj. Apt to adhere to another substance; glutinous; viscous; sticking; adhesive.
  • adj. Niggardly; closefisted; miserly.
  • adj. Holding stoutly to one's opinion or purpose; obstinate; stubborn.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Holding fast, or inclined to hold fast; inclined to retain what is in possession: with of before the thing held; hence, stubborn; obstinate.
  • Retentive; apt to retain long what is committed to it: said of the memory.
  • Niggardly; close-fisted.
  • Apt to adhere to another substance; adhesive, as ropy, glutinous, or viscous matter; sticky; viscid: as, few substances are so tenacious as tar.
  • Tough; having great cohesive force between its particles, so that they resist any effort to pull or force them asunder: as, steel is the most tenacious of all known substances.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. good at remembering
  • adj. stubbornly unyielding
  • adj. sticking together

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

From Latin tenāx, tenāc-, holding fast, from tenēre, to hold; see ten- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin tenāx ("holding fast, clinging"), from tenēre ("to hold") +‎ -ious.

Examples

Comments

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  • Even the most tenacious advocates for gun ownership must admit some of the dangers that firearms present

    October 29, 2017

  • stubbornly unyielding

    Even the most tenacious advocates for gun ownership must admit some of the dangers that firearms present

    October 19, 2016

  • محکم

    سر سخت

    چسبنده

    November 28, 2012

  • Only one thing will conquer our fears: tenacious faith in God’s presence, protection, power, and promises. ODB July 19, 2011. (tenacious = teguh, ulet)

    July 19, 2011