Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To move on or ahead; proceed.
  • intransitive v. To extend; run: The river passes through our land.
  • intransitive v. To move by: The band passed and the crowd cheered.
  • intransitive v. To move past another vehicle: The sports car passed on the right.
  • intransitive v. To gain passage despite obstacles: pass through difficult years.
  • intransitive v. To move past in time; elapse: The days passed quickly.
  • intransitive v. To be transferred from one to another; circulate: The wine passed around the table.
  • intransitive v. Sports To transfer a ball or puck to a teammate.
  • intransitive v. To be communicated or exchanged between persons: Loud words passed in the corridor.
  • intransitive v. To be transferred or conveyed to another by will or deed: The title passed to the older heir.
  • intransitive v. To undergo transition from one condition, form, quality, or characteristic to another: Daylight passed into darkness.
  • intransitive v. To come to an end: My anger suddenly passed. The headache finally passed.
  • intransitive v. To cease to exist; die. Often used with on: The patient passed on during the night.
  • intransitive v. To happen; take place: What passed during the day?
  • intransitive v. To be allowed to happen without notice or challenge: Let their rude remarks pass.
  • intransitive v. Sports & Games To decline one's turn to bid, draw, bet, compete, or play.
  • intransitive v. To decline an offer: When we offered him dessert, he passed.
  • intransitive v. To undergo an examination or a trial with favorable results.
  • intransitive v. To serve as a barely acceptable substitute: The spare tire was nearly bald but would pass until we bought a new one.
  • intransitive v. To be accepted as a member of a group by denying one's own ancestry or background.
  • intransitive v. To be approved or adopted: The motion to adjourn passed.
  • intransitive v. Law To pronounce an opinion, judgment, or sentence.
  • intransitive v. Law To sit in adjudication.
  • intransitive v. To be voided: Luckily the kidney stone passed before she had to be hospitalized.
  • intransitive v. Sports To thrust or lunge in fencing.
  • transitive v. To go by without stopping; leave behind.
  • transitive v. To go by without paying attention to; disregard or ignore: If you pass the new photographs in the collection, you'll miss some outstanding ones.
  • transitive v. To fail to pay (a dividend).
  • transitive v. To go beyond; surpass: The inheritance passed my wildest dreams.
  • transitive v. To go across; go through: We passed the border into Mexico.
  • transitive v. To undergo (a trial or examination) with favorable results: She passed every test.
  • transitive v. To cause or allow to go through a trial, test, or examination successfully: The instructor passed all the candidates.
  • transitive v. To cause to move: We passed our hands over the fabric.
  • transitive v. To cause to move into a certain position: pass a ribbon around a package.
  • transitive v. To cause to move as part of a process: pass liquid through a filter.
  • transitive v. To cause to go by: The sergeant passed his troops before the general and halted them at the grandstand.
  • transitive v. Baseball To walk (a batter).
  • transitive v. To maneuver (the bull) by means of a pase in bullfighting.
  • transitive v. To allow to go by or elapse; spend: He passed his winter in Vermont.
  • transitive v. To allow to cross a barrier: The border guard passed the tourists.
  • transitive v. To cause to be transferred from one to another; circulate: They passed the news quickly.
  • transitive v. To hand over to someone else: Please pass the bread.
  • transitive v. Sports To transfer (a ball, for example) to a teammate, as by throwing.
  • transitive v. To cause to be accepted; circulate fraudulently: pass counterfeit money.
  • transitive v. Law To transfer title or ownership of.
  • transitive v. To discharge (body waste, for example); void.
  • transitive v. To approve; adopt: The legislature passed the bill.
  • transitive v. To be sanctioned, ratified, or approved by: The bill passed the House of Representatives.
  • transitive v. To pronounce; utter: pass judgment; pass sentence on an offender.
  • n. The act of passing; passage.
  • n. A way, such as a narrow gap between mountains, that affords passage around, over, or through a barrier. See Synonyms at way.
  • n. A permit, ticket, or authorization to come and go at will.
  • n. A free ticket entitling one to transportation or admisssion.
  • n. Written leave of absence from military duty.
  • n. A sweep or run, as by an aircraft, over or toward an area or target.
  • n. A single complete cycle of operations, as by a machine or computer program.
  • n. A condition or situation, often critical in nature; a predicament. See Synonyms at crisis.
  • n. A sexual invitation or overture.
  • n. A motion of the hand or the waving of a wand.
  • n. Sports A transfer of a ball or puck between teammates.
  • n. Sports A lunge or thrust in fencing.
  • n. Baseball A base on balls.
  • n. Sports & Games A refusal to bid, draw, bet, compete, or play.
  • n. Games A winning throw of the dice in craps.
  • n. A pase in bullfighting.
  • pass away To pass out of existence; end.
  • pass away To die.
  • pass for To be accepted as or believed to be: You could pass for a teenager. The fake painting passed for an original.
  • pass off To offer, sell, or put into circulation (an imitation) as genuine: pass off glass as a gemstone.
  • pass off To present (one's self) as other than what one is: tried to pass himself off as a banker.
  • pass out To lose consciousness.
  • pass over To leave out; disregard.
  • pass up Informal To let go by; reject: pass up a chance for promotion; an opportunity too good to pass up.
  • idiom bring to pass To cause to happen.
  • idiom come to pass To occur.
  • idiom pass muster To pass an examination or inspection; measure up to a given standard.
  • idiom pass (one's) lips To be eaten or drunk.
  • idiom pass (one's) lips To issue or be spoken: Rumors never passed her lips.
  • idiom pass the hat To take up a collection of money.
  • idiom pass the time of day To exchange greetings or engage in pleasantries.
  • idiom pass the torch To relinquish (responsibilities, for example) to another or others.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier such as a mountain range; a passageway; a defile; a ford.
  • n. A single movement, especially of a hand, at, over, or along anything.
  • n. A single passage of a tool over something, or of something over a tool.
  • n. A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary.
  • n. A thrust; a sally of wit.
  • n. A sexual advance.
  • n. The act of moving the ball or puck from one player to another.
  • n. A passing of two trains in the same direction on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other overtake it.
  • n. Permission or license to pass, or to go and come.
  • n. A document granting permission to pass or to go and come; a passport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission; as, a railroad or theater pass; a military pass.
  • n. An intentional walk.
  • n. The state of things; condition; predicament; impasse.
  • n. Estimation; character.
  • n. A part, a division.
  • n. The area in a restaurant kitchen where the finished dishes are passed from the chefs to the waiting staff.
  • n. (slang) A password (especially one for a restricted-access website).
  • v. To move or be moved from one place to another.
  • v. To go past, by, over, or through; to proceed from one side to the other of; to move past.
  • v. To change from one state to another.
  • v. (of time) To elapse, to be spent.
  • v. (of time) To spend.
  • v. To happen.
  • v. To depart, to cease, to come to an end.
  • v. (often with "on" or "away") To die.
  • v. To go successfully through (an examination, trail, test, etc).
  • v. To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to become valid or effective; to obtain the formal sanction of (a legislative body).
  • v. To be be tolerated as a substitute for something else, to "do".
  • v. To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance.
  • v. To move (the ball or puck) to a teammate.
  • v. To make a lunge or swipe.
  • v. In any game, to decline to play in one's turn.
  • v. : To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess.
  • v. To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed.
  • v. : To take heed.
  • v. To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard.
  • v. To come and go in consciousness.
  • v. To go from one person to another.
  • v. To continue.
  • v. To proceed without hindrance or opposition.
  • v. To live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer.
  • v. To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over.
  • v. To cause to pass the lips; to utter; to pronounce.
  • v. Hence, to promise; to pledge.
  • v. To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just.
  • v. To put in circulation; to give currency to.
  • v. To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance.
  • v. To eliminate (something) from the body by natural processes.
  • v. To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure.
  • v. To kick (the ball) with precision rather than at full force.
  • v. To make a judgment on or upon a person or case.
  • v. To be regarded as a member of a specific sex.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier; a passageway; a defile; a ford.
  • n. A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary.
  • n. A movement of the hand over or along anything; the manipulation of a mesmerist.
  • n. A single passage of a bar, rail, sheet, etc., between the rolls.
  • n. State of things; condition; predicament.
  • n. Permission or license to pass, or to go and come; a psssport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission
  • n. Fig.: a thrust; a sally of wit.
  • n. Estimation; character.
  • n. A part; a division.
  • n. In football, hockey, and other team sports, a transfer of the ball, puck, etc., to another player of one's own team, usually at some distance. In American football, the pass is through the air by an act of throwing the ball.
  • intransitive v. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point to another; to make a transit; -- usually with a following adverb or adverbal phrase defining the kind or manner of motion
  • intransitive v. To move or be transferred from one state or condition to another; to change possession, condition, or circumstances; to undergo transition.
  • intransitive v. To move beyond the range of the senses or of knowledge; to pass away; hence, to disappear; to vanish; to depart; specifically, to depart from life; to die.
  • intransitive v. To move or to come into being or under notice; to come and go in consciousness; hence, to take place; to occur; to happen; to come; to occur progressively or in succession; to be present transitorily.
  • intransitive v. To go by or glide by, as time; to elapse; to be spent.
  • intransitive v. To go from one person to another; hence, to be given and taken freely; ; to obtain general acceptance; to be held or regarded; to circulate; to be current; -- followed by for before a word denoting value or estimation.
  • intransitive v. To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to validity or effectiveness; to be carried through a body that has power to sanction or reject; to receive legislative sanction; to be enacted
  • intransitive v. To go through any inspection or test successfully; to be approved or accepted.
  • intransitive v. To be suffered to go on; to be tolerated; hence, to continue; to live along.
  • intransitive v. To go unheeded or neglected; to proceed without hindrance or opposition.
  • intransitive v. To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess.
  • intransitive v. To take heed; to care.
  • intransitive v. To go through the intestines.
  • intransitive v. To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance.
  • intransitive v. To make a lunge or pass; to thrust.
  • intransitive v. To decline to play in one's turn; in euchre, to decline to make the trump.
  • transitive v.
  • transitive v. To go by, beyond, over, through, or the like; to proceed from one side to the other of
  • transitive v. To go from one limit to the other of; to spend; to live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer.
  • transitive v. To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard.
  • transitive v. To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed.
  • transitive v. To go successfully through, as an examination, trail, test, etc.; to obtain the formal sanction of, as a legislative body.
  • transitive v.
  • transitive v. To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over.
  • transitive v. To cause to pass the lips; to utter; to pronounce; hence, to promise; to pledge.
  • transitive v. To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just.
  • transitive v. To put in circulation; to give currency to.
  • transitive v. To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance.
  • transitive v. To emit from the bowels; to evacuate.
  • transitive v. To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure.
  • transitive v. To make, as a thrust, punto, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To come or go; move onward; proceed (from one place to another); make one's way: generally followed by an adverb or a preposition indicating the manner or direction of motion or way by which one moves: as, to pass on (without stopping); to pass away, from, into, over, under, etc.
  • To undergo transition; alter or change, either at once or by degrees, from one state or condition to another: with into or to before the word denoting the new state: as, during the operation the blue passes into green.
  • To move beyond the reach of observation, purpose, or action; vanish; disappear; hence, to depart from life; die: usually followed by away.
  • To elapse; be spent.
  • To receive approval or sanction; undergo investigation or discussion successfully; be accepted or approved.
  • To gain or have acceptance; be generally received or current: as, bank-notes pass as money.
  • To go successfully through an examination or inspection; specifically, in universities, to go successfully through an ordinary examination for a degree: as, he passed in mathematics, but failed in chemistry.
  • To be regarded or considered; be received in estimation or opinion (as): usually with for: as, he passed for a man of means.
  • To go on; take place; occur; happen: as, to bring a thing to pass; to come to passive
  • To express or pronounce an opinion, judgment, verdict, or sentence: as, to pass upon the merits of a picture or a book.
  • To thrust or lunge, as in fencing.
  • To go unheeded or neglected; go by without notice or challenge.
  • To go through a duct or opening; be voided.
  • To be interchanged; be reciprocally communicated or conveyed: as, no one knows what passed between them.
  • To be transferred as from one to another: as, the land passed to other owners.
  • To go beyond bounds; exceed toleration or belief.
  • To circulate; keep moving.
  • To care; have regard: usually with a negative.
  • To win in the old game of passage. See passage, 14.
  • In card-playing: To decline to avail one's self of an opportunity—as, in euchre, by refusing to order up, assist, or make the trump.
  • In poker and certain other games, to throw up one's hand; retire from the game.
  • To throw a ball from one to another; play “catch.”
  • To toll the passing-bell for a death.
  • To pass upon, to pass judgment or adjudicate upon (a question): as, the court dismissed the case without passing upon the merits.
  • To go by; go past without stopping.
  • To go over; cross: as, to pass a stream; to pass the threshold.
  • To issue or proceed from or through, as in utterance.

Etymologies

Middle English passen, from Old French passer, from Vulgar Latin passāre, from Latin passus, step; see pace1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English pas, pase, pace, from passen ("to pass"). See the verb section, below. (Wiktionary)
From Middle English passen, from Old French passer ("to step, walk, pass"), from Vulgar Latin *passāre ("step, walk, pass"), from Latin passus ("a step"), pandere ("to spread, unfold, stretch"), from Proto-Indo-European *patno-, from Proto-Indo-European *pete- (“to spread, stretch out”). Cognate with Old English fæþm ("armful, fathom"). More at fathom. (Wiktionary)
Short for password. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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